Day 2

See ya, Day 2. And thanks for the crankiness, mood swings and general doomsday-ishness.

​Yup, second day was rough. Couldn’t quite wake up and get going with work, no desire to socialize nor be kind (I love that kindness is on the cleanse checklist Alex posted on Facebook—such a good reminder). Headaches in the late afternoon and more soreness in my body, hips especially. My energy was low and sensitivity high (sorry to my husband – I will be making amends this weekend and wooing him with wonderful new vegan recipes. More on that below). Hello, sugar withdrawal! I hope to understand these signals from my body better as we move through this cleanse together.

The good news is I stayed on track for all five cleanse areas (gluten, alcohol, caffeine, sugar and animal products). It wasn’t difficult and surprisingly, my cravings weren’t an issue. Usually when I’m feeling down, it’s chocolate and cocktails for me. Without them, it’s just harder. Which is both understandable and weird! Surely, I can come up with better solutions that lead to a real release (exercise, meditation, yoga). I didn’t do those things, but the renewed awareness is important. But I also didn’t turn to my usual buddies, Lindt chocolate and Manhattans. I went for a handful of grapes after dinner instead. My mom always drinks a large cup of herbal tea before bed, and I do the same—the ritual and warmth never fail to calm and comfort me.


I spent a fair amount of time at Trader Joe’s stocking up: some nice herbal teas (moringa, ginger, and mango—thanks Alex for the tip!), salsas, corn chips, gluten-free crackers, unsweetened pea protein for smoothies, and a cauliflower pizza crust to make for myself on pizza night. I’m actually excited to try it. A clerk advised me to get the soy chorizo, which she crumbles to use in chili. I’m looking forward to trying new recipes over the weekend.


I ended the day by turning to a book that’s sat next to my bed for a while,
Daring Greatly, by Brené Brown. (Her TED talk on vulnerability is amazing.) The whole concept is so eye opening—that vulnerability is at the root of true connection and all emotion. We usually associate it with weakness, when in fact it’s a sign of strength and comfort with ourselves. One example she gives is love: we’d never fall in love if we didn’t permit vulnerability, because the act of loving someone and not knowing for sure if they will love you back, stay with you forever, etc., is a total leap in the dark. Of course that darkness brings us to the greatest light, as well.


​Love (and light) from Asheville,

Naomi

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